Palestine Propaganda is an Obstacle to Peace

Israeli-Palestinian tension has defined the West Bank area for years. It has been increasing in recent weeks and culminated in a violent attack on a Jerusalem synagogue. Five people were violently killed with meat cleavers and guns, by two Palestinian attackers who were later killed by police. This article is written in response to the attack. It condemns the lack of international recognition of the Palestinian propaganda and the propaganda itself, described as a, “sewer of hate against Israel and Jews.” While Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas condemned these killings, the article points to him as part of the problem. Abbas supports the anti-Jewish propaganda, by advocating the denial of Jewish history at the Temple Mount and against allowing Jews to pray at the Temple Mount. Due to laws created in 1967, Jews are not allowed to pray at the Temple Mount, only at the Western Wall below. The article points to numerous other examples of hate directed at Jews, including Palestinian authorized newspaper articles that claim that rabbis encouraged an internal hegemony by Israel. Throughout the Middle East Hamas, Jordanian Parliament and Arab newspapers among others praised the synagogue attack. This supports the articles argument that officially sanctioned Palestinian hate, encouraged by the Middle East community is the main inhibitor to peace.

The criticism of Muslim propaganda has been an increasing theme in western media. Recently, the use of propaganda by ISIS has been brought to the forefront of foreign affairs. In contrast, the use of propaganda in Palestine is not used with the intent to recruit, but instead to incite violence and anti-Jewish sentiment. As outlined in class, there are two schools of thought pertaining to propaganda. One believes that it is an inherently neutral process, while the other defines it as inherently deceitful and thus morally reprehensible. The propaganda used in Palestine would be defined as the latter. It is highly organized, supported and disseminated by the Palestinian President, official state media and state run schools. It uses myth of religious history and claim to Jerusalem to support these claims. Finally, is has a goal of creating anti-Jewish and anti-Israeli sentiments, while encouraging violence and conflict.

This article is highly opinionated and argumentative. The title, “Evil Palestinian Propaganda Deters Peace,” creates a bias before even reading the article. The intention of the article is obviously to argue the malevolence of Palestinian propaganda, in which it succeeds. However, in order to make a proper argument, both sides of the argument must be reviewed. In this sense, the article fails. It does not recognize anti-Palestinian sentiment in Jerusalem or anti-Muslim sentiment in the West that undeniably exists. While the hateful nature of Palestinian propaganda should be condemned, it is bigoted to believe that there are not two sides to the story.

-T

#349

The article can be found here: http://bit.ly/1tq6rHQ

Advertisements

4 thoughts on “Palestine Propaganda is an Obstacle to Peace

  1. Personally, I find it repulsive that Israeli politicians and media choose to focus on Palestinian propaganda as inciting hatred of Israeli citizens amongst the Palestinian population, while they themselves simultaneously facilitate the massacre of thousands of Palestinian civilians, including hundreds of children. Either these Zionist groups are being callously disingenuous, or they are so blinded by their own political religion that they are completely incapable of seeing any value in Palestinian lives. What do these Zionists think impacts Palestinian views of Israelis more: a textbook for Palestinian children that talks about their parents and friends being murdered in the streets by the Israeli Defence Force (IDF), or actually seeing firsthand their homes, families, and lives being blown to smithereens by relentless shelling from the IDF?
    This Zionist logic has made appearances elsewhere in recent years, with Israeli authorities attempting to discredit any report, from the United Nations or any other institution, as “terrorist propaganda” simply because it contains information showing Israel’s actions in a bad light. As discussed in class, this widespread conflation of anti-Zionism with anti-Semitism is a relatively new phenomenon, and, in my view, it isn’t helpful to anyone but the most extreme Zionist groups. It certainly doesn’t help to build constructive discussion.
    Unfortunately for these ideologues, it is becoming increasingly difficult for international leaders to ignore Israel’s actions. Protests have sprung up across the globe calling out Israel’s callous indifference toward the destruction of Palestinian homes and lives. If change is ever going to occur, this international pressure on Israeli leaders must not only be maintained, but increased exponentially. People must stand up with courage, not afraid to speak out against these and other atrocities, and not afraid to be called out or persecuted for refusing to suppress the truth.

  2. Personally, I find it repulsive that Israeli politicians and media choose to focus on Palestinian propaganda as inciting hatred of Israeli citizens amongst the Palestinian population, while they themselves simultaneously facilitate the massacre of thousands of Palestinian civilians, including hundreds of children. Either these Zionist groups are being callously disingenuous, or they are so blinded by their own political religion that they are completely incapable of seeing any value in Palestinian lives. What do these Zionists think impacts Palestinian views of Israelis more: a textbook for Palestinian children that talks about their parents and friends being murdered in the streets by the Israeli Defence Force (IDF), or actually seeing firsthand their homes, families, and lives being blown to smithereens by relentless shelling from the IDF?
    This Zionist logic has made appearances elsewhere in recent years, with Israeli authorities attempting to discredit any report, from the United Nations or any other institution, as “terrorist propaganda” simply because it contains information showing Israel’s actions in a bad light. As discussed in class, this widespread conflation of anti-Zionism with anti-Semitism is a relatively new phenomenon, and, in my view, it isn’t helpful to anyone but the most extreme Zionist groups. It certainly doesn’t help to build constructive discussion.
    Unfortunately for these ideologues, it is becoming increasingly difficult for international leaders to ignore Israel’s actions. Protests have sprung up across the globe calling out Israel’s callous indifference toward the destruction of Palestinian homes and lives. If change is ever going to occur, this international pressure on Israeli leaders must not only be maintained, but increased exponentially. People must stand up with courage, not afraid to speak out against these and other atrocities, and not afraid to be called out or persecuted for refusing to suppress the truth.

    -KM
    #RELS349

  3. I agree with the points you’ve made. There has to be a critical evaluation of both sides of any argument in order to have an intelligent debate with legitimacy. That being said, propaganda is always spewed like sewage from either side of any conflict. Even the article here in question, being so opinionated toward one side of the argument, could be considered propaganda. It serves a political and religious purpose showing that what low levels the Palestinian side is willing to go to. That only rallies the author’s audience against all Palestinian people. He makes them out as the enemies of Israel and Jews and does not in any way call for them to rise above such dirty and morally ambiguous tactics of their opposition. He says that their belief system, their hate, is the barrier to peace. He places all the blame on one side; instead of suggesting for ways to create peace he just says why there isn’t any. It doesn’t matter if he’s right or not. It goes back to your point of hearing both sides, you must into consideration that every problem has different perspectives. And to solve complex conflicts, like Palestine and Israel, both sides need to critically analyze themselves just as much as each other—no matter who the majority thinks is right or wrong.

    SB #349

  4. Having studied the Arab-Israeli conflict in depths, I find it so frustrating the bias that comes from the West on the whole issue. It is a very complicated matter, and for people to soley blame the Palestinians for being the barrier to a peace is so utterly naive. Though I am a white, baptised Catholic (although I consider myself atheist) Canada, I find sympathy with the Palestinians today. They are subjected to vial and inhuman conditions of living and consistently forced off their land by Jewish settlement and government. While reading your blog entry, I came to the perception that you are of pro-Jewish sentiment and consider the Palestinians to be using hate propaganda to incite the violence that has been happening for almost a century. At the end you briefly mention that the article failed because it represents a bias and does not promote the two-sides of the story. But I found your blog post to be very similar. You didn’t mention anything about the consistent and organised Jewish propaganda and education system that teaches young Jews that they are superior to the Palestinians and deserve all the land of Zion no matter what the cost. You are correct in saying that the article is biased and does not present the whole side of the story, but instead of attempting to do this in your blog post, you seemed to summarise the article and demonstrate the Western viewpoint of Israel. There is so much use of propaganda on both sides, that it would be a foolish mistake to only condemn the Palestinians use of the propaganda.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s