Does Different Religious Beliefs Matter in Marriage?

Does Different Religious Beliefs Matter in Marriage?

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Two people are in love and plan to marry, sounds easy enough right? Not when different religions are put into the equation.
A Muslim woman and a Christian man are set to marry, but are hesitant because of their different religions. In Islam, a Muslim woman cannot marry a man that is non-Muslim- the marriage that takes place would be considered invalid. The Muslim woman comes from a Muslim family who are quite liberal. The woman isn’t particularly religious, but she would like to have a religious wedding blessed by God. However, she is sure her boyfriend does not want to convert. The marriage would mean they would be married legally, but not religiously. She is contemplating whether she should ignore her conscience and marry him legally, or break up with him.
Mariella Frostrup gives the advice that religion like any other problems: bathroom habits, competitive parenting or work lives are also factors that may come between a couple. The main issues the Muslim woman should focus on are her family and the virtues of the Christian man.
I disagree with Frostrup when she compares differing religions to bad bathroom habits, competitive parenting, and work lives. To most people religion means something that is deep within their hearts, it makes up who they are. To be able to share that connection with your most significant other means being another step closer to one another. This may be a challenge because if one is not able to share one’s most precious and deepest feelings with the other, the relationship might not work out. Bathroom habits, competitive parenting and work can be changed. It doesn’t necessary define them. Most people however, don’t just change their religion because of differing views and beliefs with their significant other.
Having said that, there are marriages with couple that have different religious beliefs that do work. Respect is vital. It is a chance to discuss one’s own faith to a significant other. I think that as long as a married couple isn’t too serious about religion- that is they are able to respect each other’s religion- even if they’re both strongly religious they will have a strong relationship.
I think that the meaning of religion is different for everyone. The matter of religion and marriage can vary between each person. I believe that the Muslim woman and the Christian man should focus on what they believe and want. Ultimately, it is up to the Muslim woman and Christian man to decide if they want to marry or not. A marriage is between two people so other people can voice out their opinions but they shouldn’t have the say of if one can marry to someone or not regardless of their background and beliefs.

JT #200#uwreligions

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4 thoughts on “Does Different Religious Beliefs Matter in Marriage?

  1. This is an interesting topic that you have brought up. I see that you brought up the perspective of the Muslim woman but I would also just like to touch up on the Christian man’s perspective. In the Christian bible (2 Corinthians 6:14-18) It pretty much sums up that believers should “not be yoked together with unbelievers”. Harsh? perhaps but i think this sets a very good guideline. I feel that if two people are basing their spiritual life (which will guide their physical life) on different ideas then there will be nothing but problems down the future. I feel like it would constantly be a conversion fight seeing whose religion or faith will give up first. Having said this i know of people who share different religious beliefs and who are still happily married, i just personally feel that it would be such a tighter and more genuine relationship if two individuals share the same religion so that they can be accountable to the other and share that deeper level of a relationship in religion.

  2. This is an interesting topic that you have brought up. I see that you brought up the perspective of the Muslim woman but i would also just like to touch up on the Christian man’s perspective. In the Christian bible (2 Corinthians 6:14-18) It pretty much sums up that believers should “not be yoked together with unbelievers”. Harsh? perhaps but i think this sets a very good guideline. I feel that if two people are basing their spiritual life (which will guide their physical life) on different ideas then there will be nothing but problems down the future. I feel like it would constantly be a conversion fight seeing whose religion or faith will give up first. Having said this i know of people who share different religious beliefs and who are still happily married, i just personally feel that it would be such a tighter and more genuine relationship if two individuals share the same religion so that they can be accountable to the other and share that deeper level of a relationship in religion.

  3. Interesting article. I can sympathies with this woman. It is an understandable concern to want to have a religiously sacred wedding and marriage. Although this woman states she isn’t overly religious. If the circumstances of her religion go against her husband being Christian and voids the marriage, I would weigh the pros and cons of having your separate religions and being happy, or having a religious marriage. If having your separate religions and having a religiously sacred marriage are mutually exclusive, then in my opinion the separate religions are more important. There are millions of people around the world who live happily unmarried with their spouse. Given this situation I believe staying true to each others personal beliefs, the ones they were raised on, is more important that a marriage certificate. Given that most individuals who are brought up with religion in there home allow that religion to shape their beliefs, values and identity. Being that this marriage is later on in life, I feel it will have less of an impact to not be married than trying to convert ones fundamental identity to conform to the others religious rule. On the same note, its understandable that this woman wants to be married and have a marriage that her religion supports. All in all, I believe she must at the end of the day see what means more to her, converting her husband beliefs or conforming her requirements around a marriage.

    HJS

    #200
    #UWR
    #RELS200

  4. Interesting article. I can sympathies with this woman. It is an understandable concern to want to have a religiously sacred wedding and marriage. Although this woman states she isn’t overly religious. If the circumstances of her religion go against her husband being Christian and voids the marriage, I would weigh the pros and cons of having your separate religions and being happy, or having a religious marriage. If having your separate religions and having a religiously sacred marriage are mutually exclusive, then in my opinion the separate religions are more important. There are millions of people around the world who live happily unmarried with their spouse. Given this situation I believe staying true to each other’s personal beliefs, the ones they were raised on, is more important that a marriage certificate. Given that most individuals who are brought up with religion in there home allow that religion to shape their beliefs, values and identity. Being that this marriage is later on in life, I feel it will have less of an impact to not be married than trying to convert ones fundamental identity to conform to the others religious rule. On the same note, its understandable that this woman wants to be married and have a marriage that her religion supports. All in all, I believe she must at the end of the day see what means more to her, converting her husband beliefs or conforming her requirements around a marriage.

    HJS

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