The fight for their right

As a kid, you always loved to go on field trips. To make it even more special, if your mom or dad accompanied you as a volunteer. It made you feel so special. Now imagine, if your mom volunteered to go on the field trip, but on the day of was humiliated by your teacher and told to go back home because she did not meet the norm. It would be heart-breaking and a total embarrassment.

In a news story covered by the National, something of the sort took place in France to our victim in question, Amina. She had a headscarf on her head on the morning of the field trip and was confronted by the teacher to go back home and that she should respect the norm of the French society.

France’s 2004 law banned girls from wearing headscarf’s in state schools. The question raised here was that the daughter was not even wearing a hijab, only Amina was. The teacher’s argument was not even valid at this point because Amina was not even breaking the law. Yet, she still had to suffer the embarrassment.

This article also informs us of a teenage girl in France who attempted to commit suicide because her hijab was ripped off by some skinheads. The question I ask is that how we humans push someone to the point of having the thought of killing themselves to end the humiliation. Where has our decency gone?

The government talks so much about the fact that politics will not get in the way of one’s religion. Yet, in the world today, religious outcries happen due to political discrepancies. The war between religion and the law (politics) will never subside, and for those who practice it, there will at no time be a middle ground. This society has become of one that judges people by the color of their skin and what they wear and not by their actions that may benefit the society

Amina’s actions were meant to be polite. Being a volunteer is not hard, but taking the time out to do something for someone is what makes the difference. Amina went to do the right thing, yet she was judged for wearing a hijab. You give us the right to practice our religion, yet complain about why we are doing something out of the ordinary. Why create a law that affects the peoples’ constitutional rights and their right to religious freedom. Don’t give them the right, then take it back thinking it would be alright.

http://bit.ly/1lSXCoK

JK#349

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9 thoughts on “The fight for their right

  1. I really like how you get personal with your audience in the first paragraph of your reply. It does capture the attention of your reader. I agree that everyone in this world should feel accepted and not be embarrassed by their religion or looks. Many people can hide their religions because they may not have to show case them. But for religions that encourage to be shown, it is hard not to draw attention to you. For example, Sikh men may choose to wear a turban and like your article, Muslim women may decide to wear a hijab. I think people need to be more open and accept that there are many cultures that express their religions in different ways and that you cannot be ethnocentric and look down upon another religion. I really like the topic of your article and how you demonstrate that there is still racism occurring in schools, where it is supposed to be a safe learning environment.
    I really like how your article relates with the Religious Studies 200 class, you chose an article that includes a religion and how other people around the world react to it.

  2. This blog was very informative in raising awareness for the ignorance of select people in French society. Examples of ignorance and discrimination were exhibited in the article and blog. The first example remarked on a parent volunteer on a field trip that was discriminated against for wearing a religious headscarf called a hijab. The teacher of the class that was taking the students on the field trip confronted the parent volunteer and asked her to go back home and respect the norm of the French society. Obviously, the teacher is really the one who should go home and revaluate what the norms of the French Society really are. There is nothing wrong with a woman expressing her religious views by wearing a hijab. The teacher was out of line and extremely disrespectful. Hopefully she experiences the repercussions and consequences that she deserves. The author of this blog raises many valuable questions that we should be asking ourselves. Where has our decency gone and why create a law that affects the peoples’ constitutional rights and their right to religious freedom. These questions are not answered in the blog but it does lead the reader to think more deeply about the dilemma at hand. Hopefully, through education and over time, people in France and all around the world will learn to be more accepting of other people’s cultures and religious views.

  3. In response to the post “The Fight for Their Right” I believe that both the original article and this blog were very powerful and spoke volumes about the discrimination felt by the Muslim communities on a daily basis in multiple countries including both the USA and Canada. Although it is a part of their religion to wear a hijab Muslim women are not freely allowed to do so as a result of both the law and societal norms. Although France is a secular country it is not right for them to oppress their citizens’ freedom of religion. A secular country should mean that religion does not play a role in the decisions or actions of the government while the citizens are free to practice their religions safely and without conflict.

    In this case a teacher was the one who discriminated against the mother, and this fact is very alarming. Teachers are often credited with shaping the values and beliefs of young children. The actions taken by this teacher are undoubtedly going to have a lasting impact on the children who were exposed to the incident and could easily instill in them similar discrimination and intolerance for religious symbols and practices. This makes the likelihood of positive reform in the future for France drop drastically, the younger generation is not being given an opportunity to know better and subsequently do better than there oppressive predecessors.

    -SEF

  4. In response to the post “The Fight for Their Right” I believe that both the original article and this blog were very powerful and spoke volumes about the discrimination felt by the Muslim communities on a daily basis in multiple countries including both the USA and Canada. Although it is a part of their religion to wear a hijab Muslim women are not freely allowed to do so as a result of both the law and societal norms. Although France is a secular country it is not right for them to oppress their citizens’ freedom of religion. A secular country should mean that religion does not play a role in the decisions or actions of the government while the citizens are free to practice their religions safely and without conflict.
    In this case a teacher was the one who discriminated against the mother, and this fact is very alarming. Teachers are often credited with shaping the values and beliefs of young children. The actions taken by this teacher are undoubtedly going to have a lasting impact on the children who were exposed to the incident and could easily instill in them similar discrimination and intolerance for religious symbols and practices. This makes the likelihood of positive reform in the future for France drop drastically, the younger generation is not being given an opportunity to know better and subsequently do better than there oppressive predecessors.

  5. In response to the post “The Fight for Their Right” I believe that both the original article and this blog were very powerful and spoke volumes about the discrimination felt by the Muslim communities on a daily basis in multiple countries including both the USA and Canada. Although it is a part of their religion to wear a hijab Muslim women are not freely allowed to do so as a result of both the law and societal norms. Although France is a secular country it is not right for them to oppress their citizens’ freedom of religion. A secular country should mean that religion does not play a role in the decisions or actions of the government while the citizens are free to practice their religions safely and without conflict.
    In this case a teacher was the one who discriminated against the mother, and this fact is very alarming. Teachers are often credited with shaping the values and beliefs of young children. The actions taken by this teacher are undoubtedly going to have a lasting impact on the children who were exposed to the incident and could easily instill in them similar discrimination and intolerance for religious symbols and practices. This makes the likelihood of positive reform in the future for France drop drastically, the younger generation is not being given an opportunity to know better and subsequently do better than there oppressive predecessors.

  6. This blog was very informative in raising awareness for the ignorance of select people in French society. Examples of ignorance and discrimination were exhibited in the article and blog. The first example remarked on a parent volunteer on a field trip that was discriminated against for wearing a religious headscarf called a hijab. The teacher of the class that was taking the students on the field trip confronted the parent volunteer and asked her to go back home and respect the norm of the French society. Obviously, the teacher is really the one who should go home and revaluate what the norms of the French Society really are. There is nothing wrong with a woman expressing her religious views by wearing a hijab. The teacher was out of line and extremely disrespectful. Hopefully she experiences the repercussions and consequences that she deserves. The author of this blog raises many valuable questions that we should be asking ourselves. Where has our decency gone and why create a law that affects the peoples’ constitutional rights and their right to religious freedom. These questions are not answered in the blog but it does lead the reader to think more deeply about the dilemma at hand. Hopefully, through education and over time, people in France and all around the world will learn to be more accepting of other people’s cultures and religious views.

  7. It is a very unfortunate thing when a person is denied the right to practice and express their faith publicly. The fact that your article takes place in France does not surprise me. France employs the assimilation approach when it comes to organizing the structure of society. This “melting pot” approach is also evident in the society of the United States, but whereas the United States is considered “soft” in their assimilation policies, France is considered to be “hard” and have more extreme policies in place. As Rousseau illustrates in his work on the “Social Contract” religion is automatically a part of politics and as such the state needs a state religion with simple beliefs to unify the state behind the government. The French state seems to operate contrary to the idea of Rousseau’s civil religion. As you indicated in your post it is indeed French law that bans the wearing of headscarves by Muslim schoolgirls, but their law goes even farther in banning “all conspicuous religious symbols”, clearly separating the “church” from the state. This separation becomes even clearer since the banning of religious symbols is only in effect in government operated primary and secondary schools. This enforcement of secularism is actually required by France’s constitution policy of “laïcité” which is just the requirement to separate state and religious activities. It is ironic that such a ban is in effect in France as they do guarantee by virtue freedom of religion and freedom of thought in the Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen. There are a number of similar cases to your article where accompanying adults have been subject to the same standards as the schoolchildren, and though technically justifiable under their law on secularism, one does wonder how such religious discrimination can exist in our modern world and what can be done to reconcile the issue.

  8. I totally agree with your points, a volunteer should not be penalized for their dress code when they do not attend the institution, and especially, if they are doing the school a favor by taking time out of their day to help. A society’s norm should be adapted to their citizens; wearing a hijab does not affect anyone and being able to wear it should be a personal choice.
    There was an article recently released in British Columbia (can be found on http://bit.ly/1C2oOYl), about a student who was wearing a head scarf because it helps keep her hair away from her face. The grade three student was told by her school if she continues to choose to wear a head scarf she will no longer be allowed to return to school. According to the principal, a head scarf is only to be worn under religious matters, because it violates the school’s dress code. His comments after the news was spread was that students should not be allowed to wear head gear because the work place in the future does not permit such attire and to avoid presenting gang colours.
    According to your article, wearing a head scarf does not suit the norm of the French society. In the case of this Canadian student she is not permitted to wear a head scarf because it is not a religious piece. I believe head scarves should be permitted by anyone whether or not it is of religious matter, and whether it defies or complies with the society’s norm. A society should not condemn one’s personal choice of attire. Schools and officials should not be permitted to deny someone’s right to attend school or permission to help because of what they choose to wear, instead they should be embracing the diversity of cultures.

  9. The Fight for their right
    France has always been known to be discriminating of anyone that is not French. Yet everyone should have their right to wear any clothing they wish, the laws about wearing the headscarf’s in school is just another way of assimilating everyone into the French society. The recycling system in France is also nonexistence because they send everything on barges into north Africa where the poor sort through it and sell the useful items like cellphones and other technology that they cannot produce themselves.

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