Sudanese woman Punished for Marrying out of her Faith

Sudan woman on death row for marrying a Christian released
http://bit.ly/1onmtB6

This article talks about a Muslim woman, Meriam Ibrahim, who married a Christian man and wilfully converted to the Christian faith, resulting in her being punished for doing so . In her country of residence, Sudan, it is illegal to marry out of the Muslim faith if you are a woman, while men may do so. The Sudanese court found her guilty of apostasy for converting, and for adultery since it did not recognize her marriage to a Christian as valid. For her crime of adultery she was to receive 100 lashes as for the crime of apostasy she was to be hung. The imprisonment and sentencing of Ibrahim drew international attention, with Amnesty International and British Prime Minister Tony Blair voicing their outrage at the events that had taken place. As well many other nations and organizations called on Sudan to stand by its international human rights commitments. In international human rights law, as well as written within Sudanese law itself, it is a person’s own right to change their faith or beliefs as they choose. But judging from the Sudanese court’s first ruling in the case if Isahg it is obvious that what is practiced in the countries courts is quite a different reality than what they have committed to internationally.
Sudan as a nation introduced Islamic Sharia law in the 1980s and in recent years with the separation of the non-Muslim south to form its own nation, President Omar Bashir has advocated for a stricter implementation of Islam within the nation as well as Islamic Law. There is no longer a separation of religion and state/politics within the Sudanese nation, it is run within the bounds of the Islamic political Ideology and within the confines of Islamic Sharia Law.
Ibrahim is set to go free presumably due to the international pressure that was put on Sudan to stand by its human rights commitments, and from the outpour of support and outrage for her particular case. This story highlights the politicised aspects of Islam that are prohibiting individuals from enjoying basic human rights, such as to choose their own faith or belief systems. As well the Ibrahim case is a prime example of discrimination against women and the restrictions and limitations they face in a state run by religion and religious laws that do not recognise the female as equal. If Isag had been a man marrying a Christian woman there would have been no controversy, the facts would simply have been accepted In Sudan, males are able to marry out of the faith whereas females are denied the same right. As well as the article is a prime example of how Sudan is in direct contradiction of some of its own laws, such as those promising an individual the freedom to choose his/her own faith.
Reading cases such as that of Ibrahim, it makes us realize the importance of our basic human rights which we take for granted every day. I know I will appreciate the freedoms we have in Canada a lot more.

 

Similar/relating articles:
Sudanese Woman Condemned to Hang To Go Free
http://bit.ly/1u4v7dt

  • HD #uwreligions
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2 thoughts on “Sudanese woman Punished for Marrying out of her Faith

  1. I found this article particularly interesting due to the overwhelming nature of the punishments inflicted upon Ibrahim for something, which could be thought of in a calm manner. Resorting to violence and inflicting pain upon others is never justifiable for getting a point across, more so you end up being the target of the newly appointed hatred they probably feel. Using religion as a weapon to punish “misguided” individuals goes to show that religion, while it should be accepting is a concept, which people sometimes fear due to its irrecoverable nature.

    Being a female myself, after reading this article I not only sympathize with the victim but also feel like falling in love outside one’s religion has become more of a political feeling then an emotional one. Girls especially have much pressure upon themselves and now they have to keep in mind of whom they get into relationships with and whether her family, friends, society and religion will be accepting of her relationship. Also keeping in mind, the gender inequality in Sudan whereas a man is permitted to marry out of his faith as opposed to women. Why doesn’t the male get 100 lashes or get hung? The gender bias in Sudan is shocking because if a man and a women practice the same religious customs and traditions then why does only one get such a harsh punishment?

    A feeling of relief washes over me seeing that the United States has offered her an escape from her native country and she is freed from her death penalty. It is a particularly terrifying thought that ones native country could push one so far as to getting international assistance. She probably does not feel safe or welcomed back to place she called home for the majority of her life. Leaving everything behind as she lands in the US, despite all the pain and torture she has been the victim of, she holds herself with grace and patience. As she is greeted in the Manchester-Boston Regional Airport, the smile on her face and the poise she carries herself with shows an image of a female not to be reckoned with as her faith in herself and her decisions holds strong.

    KS #RELS200
    #uwreligions

  2. I found this article particularly interesting due to the overwhelming nature of the punishments inflicted upon Ibrahim for something, which could be thought of in a calm manner. Resorting to violence and inflicting pain upon others is never justifiable for getting a point across, more so you end up being the target of the newly appointed hatred they probably feel. Using religion as a weapon to punish “misguided” individuals goes to show that religion, while it should be accepting is a concept, which people sometimes fear due to its irrecoverable nature.

    Being a female myself, after reading this article I not only sympathize with the victim but also feel like falling in love outside one’s religion has become more of a political feeling then an emotional one. Girls especially have much pressure upon themselves and now they have to keep in mind of whom they get into relationships with and whether her family, friends, society and religion will be accepting of her relationship. Also keeping in mind, the gender inequality in Sudan whereas a man is permitted to marry out of his faith as opposed to women. Why doesn’t the male get 100 lashes or get hung? The gender bias in Sudan is shocking because if a man and a women practice the same religious customs and traditions then why does only one get such a harsh punishment?

    A feeling of relief washes over me seeing that the United States has offered her an escape from her native country and she is freed from her death penalty. It is a particularly terrifying thought that ones native country could push one so far as to getting international assistance. She probably does not feel safe or welcomed back to place she called home for the majority of her life. Leaving everything behind as she lands in the US, despite all the pain and torture she has been the victim of, she holds herself with grace and patience. As she is greeted in the Manchester-Boston Regional Airport, the smile on her face and the poise she carries herself with shows an image of a female not to be reckoned with as her faith in herself and her decisions holds strong.

    COMMENT FOR http://bit.ly/1onmtB6

    KS #RELS200

    #uwreligions

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